And the Answers Are . . .

(In some cases, where a song was recorded by many artists, I noted the lyricist. How many did you get?)

The Long Goodbye (Raymond Chandler, book; Brooks and Dunn, song)
It’s No Secret (Jefferson Airplane)
Let It Snow (Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne)
Time After Time (Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne)
Jack Frost (1998, with Michael Keaton)
Disappointed (Face to Face)
A Man For All Seasons (1966, with Paul Scofield; Robert Bolt, book)

Front and Center (Avery)
Autumn Leaves (Johnny Mercer)
All Alone (Gorillaz)
Wondering (Roy Orbison)
Once Again (Matt Redman)

Be Free (Black-Eyed Peas)
Man’s Best Friend (1993, with Ally Sheedy; poem, Timothy P. Vreeland)
Greenfields (The Brothers Four)
All Things Bright and Beautiful (Anglican hymn, Cecil Alexander; book, James Herriot)
Worth the Wait (Jordin Sparks)            and                 Goodbye to All That (Joan Didion)
Goodfellows (Oops! Goodfellas, 1990, with Robert De Niro)
Back Home Again (John Denver)
Brazil (Pink Martini)
Born in the U.S.A. (Bruce Springsteen)
Summertime (George Gershwin)
This Is My Wish For You (Charles Livingston Snell)
Cycle of Life (10 Years)

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About Tricia Pimental

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Tricia Pimental's second memoir, A Movable Marriage, has received 5 Star reviews from both Epic Book Quest and Readers' Favorite. It's available on Amazon in both Kindle (amzn.to/1RtRBwp) and print (amzn.to/1OiGlUU) versions. She is also the author of two Royal Palm Literary Award Competition-honored books: Rabbit Trail: How a Former Playboy Bunny Found Her Way, and Slippery Slopes. Other work has appeared in International Living Magazine; A Janela, the quarterly magazine of International Women in Portugal; and anthologies compiled by the Florida Writers Association and the National League of American Pen Women. A member of the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists and a former Toastmaster, Ms. Pimental resides in Portugal. She can be reached at www.triciapimental.com and on Twitter @Tricialafille.
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